Tag Archives: Ohio

Heirlooms –The Oldest

As my brother and sister and I took out each precious antique, somebody wondered what the oldest heirloom is that we have had passed down to us.  We will never know how old my sister’s hand-carved wooden bowl is (although it looks like it could have been 17th century) or how old my brother’s pieces of pewter might be.

The Antique Chest Full of Heirlooms

But thanks to my great-grandmother, grandmother and mother, we have dates and names on nearly all the items in our 2x great grandmother Mary Bassett Morgan’s chest.  I wrote about Mary and her chest, and you might want to look at the history of its travels.

When my brother and sister visited recently, we opened the chest and saw this treasure trove.

 

Inside Mary Bassett's Chest

Inside Mary Bassett’s Chest

Since the chest itself belonged to 16-year-old Mary Bassett when she traveled to Ohio in 1826/27. It surely had been made some years before, and that makes it one of our older possessions. But there was a much older item to be found.

Finding Some Old Needlecraft

We saw this stack of cloth items, stitched loosely together with a note in the handwriting of our great-grandmother Harriet Morgan sewn on top.  She identifies a collar made on a loom in 1835 by her mother Mary Bassett Morgan (the original owner of the chest).  That means Mary made this lace collar when she was 25 years old, six years after her first marriage.

lace collar

Mary Bassett Morgan collar, stitched together with a cloth made by her mother.

Note o antiques

Harriet Morgan Stout’s note sewed to antique pieces.

lace collar made by Mary Bassett

A closer look at the loom-made collar and an embroidered collar saved together.

The note says:

Collar Made on loom in 1835 by Mary [Stout Platt] Morgan Killbuck

Not to go to Columbus   Holmes Co.

What Does That Mean?

Hattie Stout

Harriett Emeline Morgan Stout

That note takes a little explaining.  Why is this package “not to go to Columbus”?  When and why did Harriet Morgan Stout write this note?

Happily, I already sleuthed out the participation of Harriet and “Doc” William Stout in a huge celebration in Ohio to mark the founding of Marietta, Ohio’s first official city in 1788.  The statewide celebration included expositions in each county of memorabilia by “pioneers.”  Please read that earlier article, and see the newspaper article describing the festivities.

That celebration took place in 1888, so we know that “Hattie” Stout wrote the note that year.  And we now know that the reason it says “not to go to Columbus” is that these precious family antiques were not to go on the road. Mary Bassett Morgan, Hattie’s mother, was still living (she died in 1890) and she probably took these items out of her well-traveled wooden chest and loaned them to Hattie and Doc for the Holmes County exposition with instructions that they be returned safely to her.

However, the collar, now preserved for 181 years, is not the oldest item.  Underneath the collars, in the first picture, you can see a woven piece of cloth. It also has a note written by Hattie Stout attached loosely with thread.

flax cloth

Woven flax cloth

 

Harriet Morgan Stout

Harriet Morgan Stout’s handwritten note on the woven flax cloth.

The note written by “Hattie” Stout in 1888 says,

Spun & made by Grandma Bassett in 1796

H E Stout

not to go to Columbus        Killbuck     Holmes Co.

It takes me a moment to absorb that information.

Our Great-grandmother is identifying a piece made by HER grandmother, Elizabeth Stone Bassett, our three times great grandmother.

The cloth was made in 1796

  • 30 years after the Declaration of Independence,
  • 8 years after the founding of Marietta Ohio,
  • 92 years before the celebration of the centennial of the founding of Marietta,
  • 220 years before I unfolded the cloth and photographed it.

Elizabeth Stone, in 1796 when she wove this piece was 23 years old,  unmarried, and living in New Hampshire. Eight years later she would marry the last of our long line of William Bassetts. They had five daughters, including my great-grandmother Mary Bassett Morgan. If you click over to the earlier story about Elizabeth Stone that I linked above, you will learn that she died soon after she and her family moved to Ohio.

Unresolved Questions

I know nothing about lace making, and a quick search on Google showed me a wide variety of types of lace and types of looms on which to weave them.  If any readers know more about this, I would love to see what a loom would look like that was used by Elizabeth Stone.

I do know a bit about flax growing and use, as you can see in this item I wrote earlier about my husband’s ancestor Rudolph Manbeck. So Elizabeth may have been using a spinning wheel like this.

Spinning Wheel and Reel

“Charlene Parker, spinner, at Knott’s Berry Farm” by DTParker1000 – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Commons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And of course we still don’t know if 1796 is the earliest heirloom that we still have in the family.

Others writings on familly heirlooms

This has been one of my occasional posts on Heirlooms. To see more, type heirlooms into the search box in the right hand column.

Other family history bloggers who write about heirlooms from time to time include:

Abraham Brink (1780)–The Story

NOTE:  Some readers of Ancestors in Aprons just want to hear the story. That is what you will find here. Some like to hear about the research. That is covered in a separate post.  If you want the details, read this.

Abraham/Abram, Brink 1780-1853

When Abraham Brink (1780) and his adult children decided to relocate to Ohio in the mid 1830s, they were part of an enormous wave of people heading westward.  Ohio’s population tripled between 1820 and 1840. By contrast, it only increased by about 50 percent from 1840 to 1860. This huge influx was due to several factors.  The Indian wars had ended, the federal government was selling military reserve land, and roads, canals and railroads were entering the new state.

Born in Dutch Country

Abraham Brink (1780) was born around Bushkill, Pennsylvania.  He was born after the Revolutionary War, but before the United States Constitution was adopted in 1787, so county lines, and even state lines, were in flux.  His part of Pennsylvania, divided from New Jersey by the Delaware River, had been part of the colony of Virginia, and as his family went about their daily business, their land changed to Pennsylvania and their county, first Northampton and then Wayne, later became Pike.

Abraham, in later years, said he was born in New Jersey, but because his children were all born in Pennsylvania, they reported that he was born in that state, too.  All in all, a confusion of place dominates the Brink family story.

The area where he lived– from southern New York along the Catskill Mountains, northwestern New Jersey and northeastern Pennsylvania– had been settled mainly by Dutch families spreading out from New Amsterdam (New York).

Moving West

Like so many early American families, the Brinks felt hemmed in by too many neighbors. After marrying, Abraham moved slightly north to Dyberry, the county seat of Wayne County, Pennsylvania.  This article points out the pleasures of that corner of Pennsylvania today, and a bit of its history when its economy was fueled by coal and a canal.

When Abraham they were in their late teens (16-18 years old) he married a woman named Lucinda and they had at least eleven children between 1800 and 1824.

  • Jesse R. (Runnels) Brink (B. About 1797. Died after 1853)
  • Martha (will specifies she is oldest daughter, and says “or heirs” Born about 1800. Died after 1853) No last name is given. Perhaps not married in 1853.
  • Mordecai Brink (1809-1863) There are many records confirming Mordecai’s information).
  • Abraham Brink (1820-1892)–This is Abraham W., my great-great-great grandfather. Many records.
  • George B. Brink (B. 1802-died after 1853)–Many records available.
  • Sarah (Brink) Shanyan(?) (died after 1853)
  • Lucy (Brink) Nagley (B. 1803, died after 1853)
  • Polly (Brink) Given Will specifies “heirs” (1805-1850)
  • Lucretia (Brink) Riplogle (B. 1814- 1891) Many records available. Lived in Michigan.
  • Roxy (Brink) Chapman (B. 1819–1898) Many records.
  • John E. Brink (1824-) Will specifies, “youngest son.” Many records.Lived in Michigan after father’s death.
  • There may be other children who died in infancy or childhood.

 

The family lived in Dyberry through at least 1830, despite reports on family trees that some of his children were born in other counties. In that decade, Abraham developed an itch to move further west. The new state of Ohio was calling.

Buying Land

After the Revolutionary War, the government set aside land in Ohio Territory to give to men who had fought in the army.  Those lands that were not used for that purpose, a Military District, were sold to settlers moving west into Ohio.

Abraham had apparently saved up money or was able to sell valuable land, because he bought four 40-acre parcels of land in Holmes County, Ohio, for which he would have paid $1.25 per acre.  Another two parcels were bought in the name of his son Mordecai, who would have been about 26 at the time.  All purchases were in the same section of land.

These purchases took place between 1835 and 1838 and by 1840, the family was settled in Killbuck Township, Holmes County, Ohio, with son Mordecai’s family living on an adjoining farm. Abraham’s wife Lucinda does not show up on the 1840 census, probably only Abraham W. and John, the youngest, are still at home. His oldest son, Jesse, originally settled in Richland Township, a neighboring area, but by 1850, he also was living near the other Brinks.

The daughters would have been old enough to be married by 1840. The 1840 census also shows two children between 10 and 14 that could be children who later died, or children of his older daughters who were living with their grandfather.

Deaths in the Family and Abraham’s Will

Tombstone of Lucinda Brink

Lucinda wife of Abram Brink

After Lucinda’s death ( in 1846 according to her tombstone at the Wolf Creek Cemetery in Holmes County) Abraham continued to live with his younger son John, even after John married in 1848.

Abraham Brink Will

Abraham Brink the elder Will.

When Abraham Brink (1780) drafted his will in August 1853, it shows a man who had a substantial farm, and had plowed most of his money back into the land.  The property was all left to his son John who had cared for him in his later years, and the children received $5 each, except for two George Brink and Sarah S____ who received $20 each. It is an intriguing discrepancy that I may never be able to explain. I do know that George, unlike most of the family, was not a farmer. He was a shoemaker, who lives in a different county in each census year.

Abraham died in the month after he wrote his will and was buried at Wolf Creek Cemetery near his wife Lucinda.

The Wanderlust Continues

While many of the family members continued to live close together in Killbuck Township, others migrated further west to Iowa and Michigan.  Even John Elisha Brink, who inherited the farm, moved to Michigan, apparently to be with a son who died at the young age of 39 of “dropsey.” (Accumulated fluid in tissues–perhaps congestive heart disease).

Puzzle Pieces Still Missing

The story of Abraham Brink is not complete with his death. I am still missing a few important details.

  • Most important,  I have not yet been able to prove for sure how many generations of Brinks he represents in North America.  Perhaps he belongs to the line of Brinks that stretch back to a couple years after the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth. If so, move over PiIgrim father William Bassett, my family has another early pioneer.
  • Although there are numerous pay stubs for a soldier in the War of 1812 named Abraham Brink, enlisted in New York, I do not know if that is THIS Abraham.
  • And who was Lucinda, my 3rd great grandmother, and where did she come from?
  • Most important of all, Abraham–Who was your Daddy??

If you want to know more details about the research behind this story, you can read the separate post dedicated to that research. (The usual notes on research can be found there, too.)

How I am Related

  • Vera Marie Kaser Badertscher is the daughter of
  • Harriette Anderson (Kaser), who is the daughter of
  • Leonard Guy Anderson, who is the son of
  • Mary Brink (Anderson), who is the daughter of
  • Abraham W. Brink, who is the son of
  • Abraham Brink (the Elder).

Mom and Dad and the Ninth, a Special Day

Today marks 78 years since my parents were married–June 9, 1938–a special day.

My sister and Brother are in Arizona for a reunion. They suggested we meet on June 9th, since that was the wedding date of Paul and Harriette V. Anderson Kaser. As I wrote in an earlier post about their courtship, the Ninth of the Month was always a special day for them, since it was the date in 1933 that they had their first official date.

The Love Letters

love letters 1938

Love letters 1938- Paul Kaser and Harriette Anderson

I am looking at letters from 1938–the year they were married.  As with most of the time during their long courtship (1933-1938), they were separated during the week and met on weekends.  Unfortunately, the letters that survive rarely include both sides of the conversation. I have almost daily letters from Dad during 1935, when they had just started dating, and not very many of his from 1938, although Mother’s letters indicate that he must still have been writing very regularly.

By 1938, Dad had landed that permanent job that qualified him (in their eyes, if not yet her parents) to marry her. He had moved into an apartment in New Philadelphia, Ohio where he worked for the federal Weather Bureau.  She was teaching school in the tiny town of Clark, Ohio and sometimes living with her sister Rhema Fair and Rhema’s husband Earl, but other times spending a night or two with her parents, Guy and Vera Anderson in nearby Killbuck, Ohio.

I have edited the letters slightly and removed the most personal (and mushy) bits.

Problems They Faced

Since she had a car and he did not, she drove to New Philadelphia each weekend, or he borrowed her car. In this letter in December 1937, it sounds like he may have gotten back late, and reflects other problems.

Well I went down to the office as soon as I arrived and they were very nice about everything so that’s all fixed. The only bad thing they let one of the other fellows drive my truck today and hes kind of hard on trucks and I don’t like that very well.

Had any sign as to how things are going to go over there this week. I hope they cool off now. {probably her parents, who did not want her to marry him.}I see in the New Phila {Philadelphia} paper where a Tusc {Tuscarawas} county teacher put under a peace bond. May be that’s what you ought to do. At least you aren’t the only teacher who has trouble with the board.

I called Mbg. {Millersburg} just now and Keith {his brother} is still coming along fairly good. I sure hope nothing sets in.

Mother told me that when she told her parents she was going to marry Paul, they didn’t believe it, and “when Paul went to talk to them, Vera (Harriette’s mother) was furious.” In later years, they became reconciled and my grandmother praised my father as being as good to her as her own sons.

The reference to the school board is because the Clark, Ohio school board continued to hold back teacher’s pay, (it was the tail end of the Great Depression after all)  a problem that Mother returns to frequently in her letters.

Paul worries about his brother, who has to have major surgery. Their father had died after surgery for a hernia.

The Special Day

Mother wrote letters like journal entries, recording her day’s activities and her feelings. One letter was being written on the 10th March, 1938.

Darlin’

Please don’t think I forgot what day yesterday was for I honestly didn’t. but last night I had such a headache I came home before P. T. A. was over and went straight to bed {Harriette suffered from migraine headaches all her life.} but dear I never forget the ninth and never will in fact it will even be more important as time goes on. Did you wonder what we would be doing on our next ninth? {June 9th when they would be married} I did. And you know what I decided.

Tomorrow evening we take the B. B. [basketball] boys to Fisher’s Restaurant and Thursday we go up to Bert Geauques for super and Friday night I am coming over to New Philadelphia, or am I? We could come back and then you could drive back Saturday, or is that too much. Just as you say.

She signed the letter “Duchess”. I explained Dad’s pet name for Mother in that earlier post, Love Letters and the Course  of True Love.

 

She returns to the subject of the Ninth in May, when, despite the fact her wedding was only two weeks away, she was on a bus trip through New York and New England and into Canada with students and other teachers.

Mother on a Road Trip

Dearest Paul,

This is the first night that I have stayed in the bus but the cabins are so terrible and cost .75 per person that I preferred to sleep in the bus with the women. Helen and Mellanie to be smart wouldn’t do it. We have gone only 721 miles, but have had a grand time and have seen a great deal. Today we were at Thousand Islands.

Mr. and Mrs. Bechtol are lovely. She popped corn tonight and when anyone fixes corn they are swell. We are going thru Vermont and New Hamp. Then for home. This afternoon I had a case of homesickness but stopped it quickly but I do have a lot to tell you. And I will always be happy after the ninth {June 9 when they are getting married}. I don’t think we will get home before Monday or Tuesday, but I will {?} all when ever we do.

I love you dearly,

Harriette

Waxing Poetic

My Dad was a great reader, and in later years my Mother said one of the works he was introduced to by his friend Delmar Alderman was The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott. He must have been under Scott’s Arthurian Romance spell when he wrote this one!

To the Duchess, From Paul, Greetings

By this token do I acknowledge My indebtedness to Thee, Fair Harriette. Thy acceptance, know then, Will but place me further in Thy debt.

For Friendship, graciously bestowed, do I thank Thee.

For Companionship, indispensible, thank Thee.

For My Mind, awakened to the good meditation, thank Thee.

For My Soul, aroused to pleasant dreams, thank Thee.

For My spirit, refreshed anew to the content of life thank Thee.

For all that thou wert, for all that Thou art, for all that Thou canst be to me, do I offer my heart I gratefulness.

Receive then, carrissime, this earnest of my obligation as bearing My whole being, an unworthy, but willing gift. And grant me yet this one prayer, that I may be Forever

Thine

Paul

The BIG Special Day, June 9, 1938

Despite the ongoing problems she had with the Clark school board getting paid and despite his over the top romantic longings, they were finally married on June 9, 1938, as I explained in Love Letters and the Course of True Love.  And she did not regret resigning from the Clark teaching job.

 Coshocton Tribune June 1938

Coshocton Tribune Article, June 15, 1938

She had hoped for a real honeymoon trip, writing from her own road trip,

We aren’t crowded in the bus and so far I don’t believe the trip will be very expensive. At least I will try to keep it from being, because there are several things I want, I wish we were on our trip now. I bet we can have a nice trip and not spend much in fact I would even like to stay in a tourist camp with you.

However, they spent their honeymoon one night at the Neil House hotel in Columbus, paying an outrageous $4.50 for their room and more to keep the car in the garage. Her memories included the smell of peanuts from the peanut vendor outside the front door.

Neil House honeymoon

Neil House hotel in Columbus Ohio and parking garage receipt for the night of their wedding.

Then they spent a few days at 4-H cap Hervida in Washington County, where Dad had been hired to lecture about weather because of his job with the Weather Bureau. There he lectured on weather subjects and she did First Aid. She noted that she had learned First Aid when she was a basketball coach.

Despite the problems and difficulties that plagued their five years of courtship, the marriage lasted the rest of their lives, and for the rest of their years, they grew nostalgic about the 9th of any month. Dad addressed anniversary cars to The Dutchess for decades.  In 1988, we celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary–marking that special day.

Paul and Harriette Kaser

Paul and Harriette Kaser, 50th Wedding Anniversary, June 1988