Travel Photo Amazes

Ben and Nettie Anderson

Ben and Nettie Anderson (My grandfather Guy’s Brother)

I have featured this sweet picture before. It shows my great-uncle Ben Anderson and his bride, Nettie. Ben has an interesting life story, and you can read about him by following the link above.

Recently, I re-discovered two more pictures of Ben and his family, vacationing in St. Augustine, Florida in January 1910. They went to the photographer’s studio to capture a travel photo. I hope they enjoyed St. Augustine as much as we did when we visited it about 75 years later. Although we were definitely attracted by different things.

No wonder Ohioans flocked to Florida for vacations.  What an exotic place! Alligators! Oranges on trees!

Ben Anderson - Florida

Ben Anderson, St. Augustine Florida January 1910

Ben Anderson family, Florida 1910

Ben, Estil and Nettie Anderson, Florida 1910

If you read my story of Ben Anderson’s life, you’ll see the irony in this picture of his family picking oranges. You see, Ben was an Ohio farmer who grew apples! Making this a busman’s holiday, as it were.

These travel photos reflect a theme of photographer’s studios in the early 20th century.  The photos are printed on a light cardstock, and the back is printed with sections for a message and an address as a postcard. The photographers created elaborate scenes starring their customers.

Neither of these postcards had been mailed.  The writing on the backs of the cards include a note that could have been from Nettie giving the date and place.  Other notes with names were written by my grandmother, my mother and by me.

Sadly, Nettie died in August 1911.

See other family travel photos with Will Stout and Maude Stout at the beach.

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Acorn Squash Pudding and Pie

acorn squash pudding

Acorn squash pudding serving with whipped cream.

Tired of Pumpkin Everything?

Thanksgiving is coming at us fast.  Along with all the traditional recipes, I like to find something new every year.  Here’s a dessert recipe that gives pumpkin a rest. And really, aren’t you about ready to scream if you hear pumpkin-flavored anything one more time?

Pssst!  Don’t tell the traditionalist, but I liked it BETTER than the very similar pumpkin dessert.

I love acorn squash. Spit them, take the seeds out, put honey and butter and nutmeg in the center–and maybe some sliced apples or applesauce, and bake them in a dish with some water in the bottom. But how about an acorn squash dessert?

Unfortunately, my husband does not share my appreciation of this long-lasting winter squash.  When I serve him a wedge of acorn squash, he scoops out a shallow spoonful, but leaves a good 1/2 inch in the shell.

And he does not have seconds.

LEFTOVERS

So if I bake acorn squash, I’m going to have leftovers.  And you know my opinion of leftovers, don’t you?  MAKE SOMETHING WITH THEM.

Which led to a quest for a good recipe for acorn squash pudding.  Along the way, I found the site, Historic Foodie, and this article on how early Americans used squash. Another article at the same site lists  all the squashes common in various parts of the country in the 17th and 18th century. (Acorn was known, but not common.)

Most recipe sites wanted me to make a pie out of the squash, but I was feeling lazy and just wanted to baked a pudding.  However, when I found a recipe for a streusel-topped acorn squash pie, I knew I had to try it — minus the pie crust. You can also just pour it into a pre-baked pie shell for a substitute for pumpkin pie. Simple and absolutely DELICIOUS!

My husband, the acorn-squash avoider is eating it up!

squash pudding

Acorn squash pudding in deep casserole

Note: I am switching to a new recipe  display, so bear with me as I experiment.  I welcome all comments on how the recipes look, or how to make them more useful for you,

squash pudding
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Acorn Squash Pudding

When you are tired of pumpkin everything, make a streusel-topped pudding or a pie filling from acorn squash.
Course Dessert
Keyword pudding
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked acorn squash
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp spices See Note
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup evaporated milk

Streusel Topping

  • 2/3 cup flour
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup butter chilled
  • 1/3 cup sliced almonds

Instructions

  • Scoop squash out of shell and remove seeds. Mash or process in food processor.
  • Mix all ingredients in large bowl and beat until smooth.
  • Pour into 7" wide, deep casserole and bake one-half hour at 350 degrees. (To ensure even cooking, put casserole in larger shallow pan with an inch of water.)

Streusel Topping

  • Mix flour and sugar. Cut butter in small pieces.  Work butter into flour/sugar mixture with your fingers.  When you have small crumbs, stir in nuts. Set aside until the first half-hour baking is finished.
  • After half hour, pull casserole out of oven and sprinkle the streusel on top of the pudding. Put casserole back and bake an additional half hour--or until knife inserted in center comes out almost clean. (With smaller diameter casserole, the streusel will be deep and the baking will take longer than for a shallow dish or in a pie.)

Notes

SPICES:  You can use pumpkin pie spices or blend cinnamon and nutmeg.  I used a lebkuchengewuerz spice recipe left over from making the German Christmas cookies.
PIE:  To use this recipe in a pie, put pudding into a pre-baked pie shell. Bake 25 minutes at 375 degrees, then add streusel and bake another 25 minutes, tenting the top with foil if necessary to keep it from getting too brown.
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Will and Maude Stout in Happier Days

Will and Maude Stout did not always fight. Perhaps Maude doesn’t look terribly happy in these childhood photos, but it is heart warming to see that they traveled together with their spouses and individually they knew how to have a good time.

Will and Maude Stout

Will and Maude Stout, circa 1877

Will and Maud Stout

Will M. Stout and Mary (Maude) Stout, May, 1881

The three siblings were together, presumably in New York City in 1900 or 1901.  Here you see the three siblings on the right hand side and the two spouses on the left. Maude looks so sweet in this picture compared to her youthful pictures, and her later reputation.

Vera (center) had graduated high school In May 1899 when she was sent to New York to go to secretarial school and live with her brother Will. The school did not last long, as she was listed on the 1900 census as living at home with her parents.  However, her brother Will, was also at home in Killbuck on June 4 when the census was taken. Perhaps they both returned to New York that month, because surely Will and Jean were married by the time this picture was taken.

At any rate, this beautiful photograph captures what was probably the most joyful time in the lives of all five of them.

The Stout siblings and spouses

Jean Stout, Vera Stout, Maude Stout Bartlett, Carlos Bartlett and Will Stout 1900 or 1901 in New York City

Will and his wife Jean even traveled with Maude and Carlos. Here is a fading tintype from Niagara Falls. It is speckly because I enhanced as much as possible.  Will  and Jean  married in 1900 and Carlos and Maude married in 1898, and the photo was presumably taken not long after Will and Jean’s marriage. I think this photo is interesting because I believe it is taken in a photographer’s studio with the quartet posed against a painted background.

 

Stout visit Niagara Falls

Jean and Bill M. Stout, Maude and Carlos Bartlett at Niagara Falls Circa 1905

And just for fun, here are a couple more vacation pictures–these on the beach.

This picture of Maude Stout Bartlett might have been taken on her honeymoon.  I have not concrete information, but this must be Florida, and her bathing dress indicates very late 1800s or early 1900s.

Maude Stout Bartlett

Maude Stout Bartlett at beach in Florida Circa 1898 (Honeymoon?)

And here are Will and Jean Stout at the beach –probably close to New York City–with a group of friends.  Jean wrote on the back that the photo was taken by Mr. Benedict. There is a couple named Benedict in the photo of Bill and Jean’s dinner party in New York City, which I showed on this post.    Someone has circled Will in the back row and Jean in the next row down.

The other thing that intrigues me about this photograph– besides the wonderful bathing costumes–I wonder who the children are.  For sure one of the girls in the front row must be Jean’s daughter from her first marriage. Which one, I wonder?  I have no other  photos that show her, so would love to know.  In case you know her, I’m looking for  children or grandchildren of Margaret Rogers (born Oct. 1893) Owens. She married in December 1916. Her husband’s name: Temple Hubert Owens. They lived in New Jersey, but in 1952 lived in Georgia. Her husband died and was buried in Earlville New York in 1957, but I do not have information about her death. Can you help?

Will and Jean Stout at beach

Will and Jean Stout at beach with friends

Now you know that Will and Maude Stout did know how to have fun!

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