Tag Archives: William Stout

Obadiah Stout: Turbulent Times

Obadiah Stout 1745-1830

Frankly, if it had been up to me, I doubt that the Ohio Country of the Northwest Territory would have been settled. Thank goodness for people like Obadiah Stout and his family.

Obadiah Sout, my 6th great uncle, child of Freegift Stout, lived a life on the front edge of history and the western edge of American civilization in the late 18th century. When he died, he left behind sons and grandsons who broke new trails even further west than he wandered. That makes Obadiah well worth investigating. But what a bunch of mysteries remain.

The Mysteries of the Basic Facts about Obadiah Stout

Researching Obadiah Stout resembles putting together a jigsaw puzzle after someone has spilled it on the floor and several pieces have rolled under the sofa. Among the things I do not know:

  • When did Obadiah marry?
  • What was the maiden name of his wife? She is known as Mary McBride or Margaret McBride, but Stout and Allied Families says she was a widow of a McBride. (I assume her name was Mary Margaret.)
  • Where were his first two sons born? Which relates to when did he leave New Jersey?
  • Where exactly did he go when he left New Jersey?
  • Although there are census records with age for a few of his ten children, I have no other proof of when they were born, and therefore the “where” is also in doubt. In fact, two of the children who are most frequently listed in family trees may not exist. And one source lists two others that I do not include for lack of corroborating evidence.

The Mystery of the Revolutionary War Service of Obadiah Stout

But if you think all of that is frustrating—Obadiah was the right age to serve in the Revolutionary War, and New Jersey was in the epicenter of the fighting.

The Daughters of the Revolution, in compiling a list of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Ohio,1929, list him as a soldier. The Adjutant General of the State took their work at face value, and distributed the book of Ohio soldiers’ graves. However, their “proof” of Obadiah turns out to be a reference in a paper written by a member of a Historical society. And although I have not seen that paper, I’m willing to bet it was based on the book, A History of Adams County,Ohio (1900) the earliest source I have found for the information. That book, by Evans and Stivers, states “(Obadiah) was a native of New Jersey and had served in the Revolutionary War.” Later books use the same words.

Here’s the catch. The Adjutant General of New Jersey made a list of all the Jerseyites who served, and Obadiah is nowhere in that book. (1929) Obadiah moved to Pennsylvania’s “Redstone Country” between 1774 and 1777. So could he have first moved to Pennsylvania and THEN signed up to fight? Given the importance attached to service during the Revolutionary War, it seems odd that if he served, no one mentions with what unit, in what state, and for what period of time he served. But as I read of frontier life, maybe not so odd after all.

1776 Pennsylvania Counties
The county lines of Pennsylvania in 1776. From the book The Pennsylvania Line: Regimental Organization and Operations 1776-1783 by Tressell.

Obadiah Stout Lived in the Wild West

He lived in Redstone Country in Western Pennsylvania after he left New Jersey, and the area, probably Westmoreland County, definitely classified as frontier. While many men were conscripted or volunteered to fight during the Revolution,they spent their service protecting settlers from Indians rather than fighting the British.

There is a reason that all of the information about Obadiah and his family is so hard to find. A book entitled The Pennsylvania Line: Regimental Organization and Operations 1776-1783 brings home to me how rough shod life was on the Pennsylvania frontier. I read there, “…company personnel records virtually non-existent.” So there you have it. . Law enforcement, let alone bureaucracy, had not been well developed in this “Wild West.” And record keeping was not a priority in frontier Kentucky or Ohio, either.

The Mystery of When and Where He Migrated

Redstone Country

Obadiah left New Jersey with other Jerseyites who were heading west. At some point he married a widow, Mary Margaret (McBride), either in New Jersey or Pennsylvania. Lacking proof of birth, the consensus is that his first son was born in 1774, but in which state? Some trees say that his third son was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, but again, I have no proof.

Many accounts say that Obadiah migrated to Redstone, Pennsylvania. If we look at current maps, that looks like a township just south of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. However, typical of the fast-changing geography of the 18th century, the complete story is complex.

According to Old Times in Old Monmouth,(1887), page 24, a wave of emigrants from New Jersey moved westward between 1780 and 1850. They emigrated to “Redstone Country.” Redstone Country consists of red rock lands in Pennsylvania and Virginia west of the (Allegheny) mountains.

It seems likely that the settlers who traveled from Monmouth County, New Jersey to Pennsylvania, were following Redstone Creek, which wanders north from the southern boundary of Pennsylvania toward the Monongahela River. The New Jersey emigrants might possibly have headed for the protection of a fort built in 1759.

Fort Redstone

From Wikipedia, describing the 1759 construction of Fort Redstone:

Geopolitically, Redstone was a frequent point of embarkation to cross the Monongahela River for travelers who had crossed the Alleghenies or were heading west via the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers by boat…Redstone Old Fort was the terminus of an Indian trail which settlers improved around the 1750. They afterward called it Nemacolin’s Trail, named after the Indian chief who assisted the improvement through the mountain pass. From this area, travelers could travel by water downstream on the Monongahela river to what is now Pittsburgh, or overland, by trails that later became Brownsville Road to the same destination The fortress site was chosen to guard and command the crossing point[notes 2] of the formidable east-west obstacle of the Monongahela River along the route of an Indian trail from the Potomac River—along one of the few mountain passes allowing traffic between the Ohio Country and the eastern seaboard cities.

The early settlement around the fort also came to be called Redstone, but eventually became known as Brownsville, Pennsylvania after its farsighted developer Thomas Brown. The use of “Redstone” devolved to apply to just one of its neighborhoods.

Father Changes Will

The more I read, the further I get from knowing exactly when and where Obadiah Stout traveled to and how he got there. A tiny clue exists. In 1763, his father had willed him land in New Jersey. A 1766 codicil to his father’s will changed that legacy to cash. Perhaps because he had traveled west?

Obadiah Joins Political Movement

Map of proposed state of Westsylvania 1776
Map of proposed state of Westsylvania from western Pennsylvania, parts of Virginia (later West Virginia) and Kentucky.

He could have gone by boat. He could have traveled by wagon across the Allegheny Mountains. The only solid clue lies in the fact that he joined a movement known as the Mercantile Movement in 1768, that organized around Fort Pitt in Pittsburgh. Their purpose, to form a territory known as Westsylvania, failed. Shortly thereafter, Obadiah moved on to Kentucky, across the Ohio River from the Ohio Territory.

Kentucky, on the Ohio River

Ohio Country- full

Note in this map, the red ex beside Blue Licks 1782. The settlement sits on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River. In early 1780, Obadiah and his family–wife and 4 or 5 sons who had been born in New Jersey or in Pennsylvania–moved to Blue Licks, Kentucky on Limestone Creek. Stout and Allied Families, calls the location Stout’s Bottom. The only mention I found a mention of Stout’s Bottom in a list published in the 1929 of geographical points along the Ohio River. It states that Stout’s Landing (!) is at the end of the Lewis County Kentucky highway leading to (ta-da!) Stout’s Bottom. However, I don’t know that the unfortunate name survived into this century.

More Politics–Kentucky County Lines

From https://www.kyatlas.com/+historic-counties/1790.html

Another small clue to his whereabouts can be seen in two petitions he signed in the 1780s, along with citizens of Bourbon County, who wanted Limestone Creek included in Bourbon County. Bourbon County was formed from Fayette County in 1786. Mason County was formed from Bourbon County in 1789, so the citizens apparently tried to influence the legislature’s decision on boundaries. The Kentuckians submitted their petition to the legislature of Virginia, as That state still governed Kentucky. The LImestone Creek folks failed in their attempt to join Bourbon County. Whether that influenced his next move, or he was trying to find a safer place for his family, by 1790 he had moved again.

Since they had moved to Kentucky, the family had added the first girl, born in 1782, and two boys born in 1783 and 1784. The last two daughters also must have been born in Kentucky, in 1785 and 1787. The family now included ten children, and they lived a life under siege. The settlers rowed across the Ohio River and cleared land, hoping to be able to settle there once the hostilities with the Indians allowed. Islands in the great river served as pastures for cattle, and their families stayed on the safer, Kentucky bank of the river.

A fort called Graham’s Station provided a haven against Indian attacks, and the family was there in 1790 when a ferocious attack occurred. Obadiah’s 7-year old son and namesake, and his 6-year-old son, John, were both scalped and died.

Obadiah Founds a Town in Ohio Country

In August 1795, the United States signed a treaty with Indian tribes in the Northwest Territory, unleashing an influx of settlers. The situation finally had calmed enough that Obadiah moved across the river to what became Green Township in Adams County Ohio. Specifically, he settled on Putenney’s Fork of Stout’s Run, just about directly across the Ohio River from the unfortunate Graham’s Station. (No trace of that Indian fort where he lost two of his children survives.)

People called the little village that Obadiah started with his family, Stout. If the ages I have for his children are right, he and his wife took with him across the river eight children, ranging in age from eight to twenty-one. The History of Adams County credits Obadiah with being the first settler in Green Township, although the county did not have an official name for another two years.

As he did everywhere, Obadiah took an active part in community life. In 1806 residents of the county voted at Obadiah’s home. and Green Township got a name. His fellow citizens also called on him to serve on juries.

Obadiah’s son William (1778-1860), married in 1799 in Ohio (Marriage listed in The History of Adams County). He fathered the first white child born in Green Township, a boy christened Obadiah for his grandfather. The book on Adams County lists 1796 as the birth date for Obadiah Jr. which makes a good story, since that is the year they list as Obadiah becoming the first settler in the county. However since the same book says William and his wife, Margaret Bennett married in 1799, something is amiss. Either the date of birth of the little Obadiah is off–or Margaret and Obadiah did not get married for a while. The latter is reasonable, given the paucity of judges or ministers to perform the ceremony.

Obadiah Stout’s wife Margaret died in 1823 and Obadiah in 1830, both in Adams County, both buried in Stout’s Graveyard.

I am tempted to follow the trails of all the sons and grandsons of Freegift and Obadiah Stout in separate posts, but if I do, the exercise will sidetrack me from my exploration of my main line.

I did write about Aaron Stout and his family here. Aaron moved to Putnam County, Ohio around 1820, a generation after Obadiah’s move to Pennsylvania in the 1770s.

Jediah Stout, born in 1757, the son of Benjamin who was the brother of my ancestor Freegift, settled in Kentucky by 1785, but further south instead of along the Ohio River like Obadiah. I cannot guess whether they were aware of the move they had in common.

Just because I can’t entirely ignore them–here are two of the descendants of Freegift and Obadiah who founded towns in the West.

William Stout , Founder of Another Ohio Town

Plaque at the town of Rome, https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM2B9G_Rome_Adams_County_Ohio

Another William (1806-1859), the son of the William (1778-1860) mentioned above, perhaps founded the town of Rome in 1835, just down the road from the settlement called Stout. Since the post office came first, it retained the name Stout. The postmaster William Stout also ran a small store. Confusion reigns about which William founded Rome and which served as postmaster. This commemorative sign indicates the senior William, but I tend to believe the History of Adams County, that indicates it was the son who did both, because the book explains that William ran a small store with his brother John. William Senior’s only brother John was scalped by Indians as a child.

Elisha Pinckney Stout, Founder of Two Cities

Although most of William Stout Sr.’s children stayed in Green Township, Adams County, his grandson, Elisha Pinckney Stout, had enough adventures to make up for all of his aunts and uncles and cousins. Elisha, son of William Jr., had been born in Greene Township, Adams County, Ohio. Between 1854 and 1860, He moved to Kansas and Iowa, was a founder of Omaha; elected legislator in Nebraska territory; a gold-hunter at Pike’s Peak; a founder of Denver (where there is still a street named Stout) , and at the age of 25, upon returning to Ohio and getting married, he joined the Union Army where he served as a suttler. A suttler provided goods to soldiers as a civil traveling merchant. He established a prosperous life in the Cincinnati area. He traded in tobacco, had other business interests, and became a prominent banker. Elisha took his last journey toward the end of his life, and I have not discovered why, but in December, 1913 at the age of 79, he died in Los Angeles.

How I Am Related

  • Vera Marie Badertscher is the daughter of
  • Harriette Anderson Kaser, who is the daughter of
  • Vera Stout Anderson, who is the daughter of
  • William Cochran (Doc) Stout, who is the son of
  • Isaiah Stout (1822), who is the son of
  • Isaac Stout (1800), who is the son of
  • Isaiah Stout (1773) who is the son of
  • Isaac Stout (1740) who is the son of
  • Freegift Stout, who is the father of
  • Obadiah Stout, who is the father of
  • William Stout, Sr., who is the father of
  • William Stout, Jr., who is the father of
  • Elisha Pinckney Stout.

Notes on Research

  • A History of Adams County; From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present. First Settlers of Greene Township; Nelson Wily Evans and Emmons B Stivers, 1916 Available on books.google.com and on archive.org as a free ebook. (Includes biograph of Elisha Pinkney Stout.
  • Westslyvania Pioneers 1774-1776; William C. Frederick III, Meching Bookbindery: Chicago 1991, Reprinted 2005.
  • Old Times in Old Monmouth; George Beekman and Edwin Salter, Self published 1887. Fairchild NJ: Office of the Monmouth Democrat, 1894. Available at archive.org in digital form.
  • Stout and Allied Families, Vol. 1, Harold F. Stout, Cpt. USN, 1951; self-published. Available at archive.org
  • The Official Roster of the Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried in Ohio, Vol. II Assembled by D.A.R.; published by the Adjutant General of Ohio; Columbus Ohio: F. J. Heer Co. 1929. Available at archive.org in digital format.
  • West Virginia and Its People, Vol. IV; Thomas Condit Miller and Hew Maxwell; Lewis Historical Publishing Company 1913. “The Stout Line” , pg. 1103. I am citing this only because several Ancestry trees quote it. It has several errors in the content on the Stouts, and I do not believe it is reliable.
  • United States Federal Census Reports Green Twp, Adams Co. Ohio, 1820; 1830;1840;1850; 1860; Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, 1870; Wyoming, Hamilton, Ohio 1880; Springfield, Hamilton, Ohio, 1900, 1910.
  • Tax Lists Mason County Kentucky, 1790; Green, Adams, Ohio, 1808;
  • Petitions of the early inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia : 1769-1792 Ancestry.com, Family Search.org
  • Find a Grave, Obediah Stout; William Thomas Stout, Sr.; William Thomas Stout Jr.; Elisha Pinkney Stout (This memorial quotes at length from sources regarding Elisha’s life.)

The Stout Family Pictures Raise Questions

At some point late in their mother’s life, the Stout brothers and sisters gathered at the Stout farm in Guernsey County.  It was an important occasion, because Tom Stout came all the way from Wyoming, and Frank (John Franklin) Stout came from Omaha Nebraska.  Not only did the four boys have their picture taken together, but I have just discovered a Stout family picture, another photo that includes the aging Emeline Stout.  I have shown the picture of the Stout boys earlier, but mistakenly thought they might have gathered for Emeline’s funeral in 1905.  I now know the four brothers were together somewhat earlier than March, 1905.

The Stout Brothers

The Stout Brothers

These Stout brothers are (clockwise from top left) Tom Stout, rancher from Wyoming; John Franklin (Frank) Stout, a lawyer from Omaha Nebraska, Dr. George Stout from Guernsey County,Ohio and  my great-grandfather William C. (‘Doc’) Stout from Holmes County, Ohio.

How do I know  with such certainty the photos are from the same day?  The photographs were taken in the same studio in Guernsey County and framed in the same cardboard frames.  The three brothers who are in both photos are wearing identical clothing.

Here’s the Stout family picture I just found, with Emeline and six of her children, plus a son-in-law.

Emeline Stout Family late 1890s

Stout Family late 1890s. Labeled by Vera Stout Anderson: “1st Row, Uncle Tom Stout, Grandma Stout and W. C. Stout (Dad) 2nd Row. Uncle Frank Stout, Aunt Lib Cunningham, Aunt Sade Scott and Uncle Edd Scott.”

DETAILS

Great-great grandmother Emeline is squinting her eyes, because she had lost most of her eyesight later in life.

Judging by the leg of mutton or gigot sleeves on the two younger women, I believe this photo was taken in the last half of the 1890s. A velvet vertical trim adorns Aunt Sade’s double-breasted jacket . Aunt Lib’s outfit is even more elaborately adorned, with flaps extending out from the shoulder over the tops of the large gathered sleeves, light-colored embroidery trim on the jacket and collar, and a light-colored ribbon bow on her right side at the waist. It looks like she has a chain, but the locket is tucked inside her jacket.

The women look as though they are wearing winter clothes, however the four sons posed on a porch.  Perhaps that was not a real porch, but a staged set at the photographer’s studio? Whether they went to the studio for their picture, or the photographer went to Emeline’s farm, I am certain that the family portrait was taken in Emeline’s home. I can see a photograph on the wall which is part of my collection of old photos. Emeline also had a lovely patterned wallpaper on the wall.

Interesting that the two Ohioans are wearing the string bow tie, and the two westerners the large four-in-hand.

I am curious about the star-shaped dangle on a watch chain worn by rancher Tom.  I’m guessing it is the symbol of some fraternal organization.  Anyone out there have a clue?

One More Photograph

It was quite a day for photographs.  My great-grandfather, W.C. (Doc) Stout also posed for an individual photograph on that day.

Dr. Stout

Doctor William Cochran Stout, my great-grandfather

Besides not knowing the exact year of the Stout family picture, some mysteries remain.

The Photographer

Addison, Quaker City, it says on the front of the cardboard frame of the Stout family picture. Quaker City was the town nearest the Stout farm in Guernsey County, Ohio. Many times I get help dating pictures by looking at lists, particularly Langdon Road, that list old photographers. However, I have not found a reference on line, so know nothing about the Addison Photography Studio in Quaker City.

The Missing Siblings

Where was brother George in the Stout family picture?  Since he was a doctor practicing in Guernsey County, perhaps he was called out for a patient.

Where were sister Martha (Mattie) Stout Cunningham and her husband? They lived in Guernsey County.

Why was Aunt Sades husband the only spouse included in the family portrait?  It is quite possible that Tom’s and Frank’s wives did not make the long trip from out West, but W.C. Stout and Dr. George Stout and Lib Cunningham all lived nearby, yet their spouses are not pictured.

And the biggest question of all–what brought this family together?  It was not a wedding, nobody had died in the late 1890s, Emeline would have turned 70 in 1898. Could the family have gathered for her birthday? I’m missing something here. Something that was important enough to draw the entire family together, and commemorate the event with a photograph.

Meanwhile, however, I have the photograph to add to the others of Great-great-grandmother Emeline Cochran Stout.

How I am Related

  • Vera Marie Kaser Badertscher is the daughter of
  • Harriette Anderson Kaser, the daughter of
  • Vera Stout Anderson, the daughter of
  • William C. Stout, the son of
  • Emeline Cochran Stout

William C. Stout is also brother to

  • Tom Stout
  • John Franklin Stout
  • George Stout
  • Elizabeth (Lib) Stout Cunningham
  • Sarah (Sade) Stout
  • Martha (Mattie) Stout

who are therefore my 2 X great-uncles and 2 X great-aunts

 

Wedding Heirlooms for Valentine’s Day

The love story of Harriet Morgan and newly minted doctor William Stout starts on the bridge just outside Killbuck, Ohio. Before I show you some of the things that my great-grandmother saved from her wedding in 1860, you can click on this link and read about how the couple met.

If you have been following the story of Harriet’s mother and father–Mary and Jesse Morgan–you will understand why Harriet’s mother, Mary, may have been cautious about this young man who showed up at her doorstep with her daughter. At any rate they married. The newly weds stayed in Killbuck, perhaps a requirement by Mary or perhaps because Harriet did not want to leave her mother alone. Doc Stout started practicing medicine at a time when there were already two doctors practicing in the tiny town.

My mother told the romantic story over and over. The fact that mother knew the story so well, indicates to me that great-grandma Harriet (Hattie) Morgan Stout liked to tell the story herself.  Thank goodness for her romantic soul. Without her devotion to preserving famly memories, my family history would lack all this tangible reminders of my ancestors.

We got a peek at great-grandmother Harriet’s wedding dress when I photographed the crazy quilt that she made with the help of her mother-in-law in the early 20th century.

crazy quilt

Emeline Cochran Stout’s crazy quilt.

 

The small pieces of green material were from Harriet’s wedding dress.  The embossed silk material does not show up to the best advantage in this picture. And why green?  After all, when Queen Victoria married in 1840, she wore white, starting a trend that now rules bridal choices.  At any rate, Hattie chose green. Perhaps the material was easily available, or marked down. Most likely she wanted a material that could be reused for something more practical in the future. The material is shiny–slightly duller in the background than the very shiny embossed design, which made it dificult to photograph.  The color is actually a bit deeper than I could persuade my camera to reflect.

wedding dress

Harriet Morgan Stout’s Wedding dress material 1860

Mother’s note, pinned to the scraps of material, says that the wedding dress had three skirts made of this material.  Harriet’s mother was a seamstress, but nevertheless it would have taken some time to make such a complex dress. Although no wedding picture survives the-is picture from the Metropolitan Museum helps me imagine what Hattie might have looked like in her green wedding dress.

1860s dress

1860s dress, photo from Metropolitan Museum

How practical my grandmothers and great-grandmothers were! It would not occur to me to cut up a preciouis dress and make something else out of it–like a quilt.  But Great-Grandma Harriet Stout remade more than the dress. Here is what happened to a vest belonging to “Doc” Stout. (I do not have a record indicating that it is a wedding vest, but doesn’t that seem likely?) I have read that white was the common color for men’s waistcoats/vests in the 1860s, but I wonder if Hattie would have bothered to save a piece of any old vest

Doc Stout's vest

Doc Stout’s vest made into a doily, Maude Bartlett’s note.

The crocheted edge is beautifully executed as is the embroidered edge around the circle to serve as a hem. Someone–I assume it was Harriet–worked very hard on this beautiful little gem.

My Great Aunt Maude Stout Bartlett wrote the attached note identifying the piece. (Thank you Aunt Maude!) She also added “for Harriette.”  For the last ten or fifteen years of her life, this childless woman sorted her family treasures, from furniture to tea cups and put notes on them as to who was to inherit them.  Her determination to control her belongings beyond the grave become a family joke. When my sister and brother were visiting last summer and we went through Mary Morgan Stout’s chest of treasures, my sister Paula found a beaded bag with a note I had stuck inside “For Paula when I am gone.” As I get older, I am no longer laughing at Aunt Maude’s attempt to be sure that precious memories would go to someone who would appreciate them.

Back to Hattie and Wiliam’s wedding–In Victorian times, no lady would go out of the house without gloves or without a pretty handkerchief. In fact, this tradition continued for the next one hundred years. As a newlywed in the 1960s, I would wear gloves even if I was making a trip to the department store. Paper tissues had not yet pushed aside handkerchiefs in the 1960s, either. But I never have seen such a gorgeous handkerchief as this one from the 1860 wedding. The wide border of delicate lace is absolutely stunning.

Wedding clothes

Aunt Maude’s note on 1860 gloves and handkerchief (note circa 1960)

Harriet Stout wedding gloes and handkerchief 1860

I tried to put on these soft leather gloves that belonged to Harriet Morgan Stout, but they are way too small. It surprised me because I have pretty small hands, and pictures we have of “Hattie” in later years show a fairly “substantial” lady. She must have been quite petite when she married.

Not to be outdone, William Stout also carried a fancy handkerchief (known as a pocket square). When I say fancy, I am implying that it is decorative rather than practical!  Silk,  in taupe, with a gold embossed design.

wedding handkerchief

Doc Stout’s wedding handkerchief

I wish I had a photograph that could be identified as a wedding picure of William and Hattie, however we’ll have to settle for these pieces of the wedding clothing–not a bad substitute, in my opinion.

All of these famly heirlooms came from Mary Bassett’s wooden chest.

 HOW I AM RELATED

  • Vera Marie Badertscher is the daughter of
  • Harriette Anderson Kaser, who is the daughter of
  • Vera Stout Anderson, who is the daughter of
  • William and Harriette (Morgan) Stout.

Family Heirloom Bloggers

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco, Everyone Has a Story to Tell,  started a Family Heirloom challenge in November 2015 asking fellow bloggers to join me in telling the stories of their family heirlooms. Here are some of the bloggers who who also blog about heirlooms.

Cathy Meder-Dempsey at Opening Doors in Brick Walls
Karen Biesfeld at Vorfahrensucher
Kendra Schmidt at trekthrutime
Linda Stufflebean at Empty Branches on the Family Tree
Schalene Jennings Dagutis at Tangled Roots and Trees
True Lewis at Notes to Myself  
Heather Lisa Dubnick at  Little Oak Blog
Kathy Rice at Every Leaf Has a Story
Mary Harrell-Sesniak at  Genealogy Bank Heirlooms Blog